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Researchers Discover Strong Correlation between Severe Vitamin D deficiency and Mortality Rates

After studying global data from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, a research team led by Northwestern University has discovered a strong correlation between severe vitamin D deficiency and mortality rates.

The theory was put forth after a statistical analysis of data from hospitals and clinics across China, France, Germany, Italy, Iran, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States.

The researchers noted that patients from countries with high COVID-19 mortality rates, such as Italy, Spain and the UK, had lower levels of vitamin D compared to patients in countries that were not as severely affected.

Though Vadim Backman, who led the research said that the results needed further study. “While I think it is important for people to know that vitamin D deficiency might play a role in mortality, we don’t need to push vitamin D on everybody,” he said.

Backman and his team were inspired to examine vitamin D levels after noticing unexplained differences in COVID-19 mortality rates from country to country.

By analyzing publicly available patient data from around the globe, Backman and his team discovered a strong correlation between vitamin D levels and cytokine storm — a hyperinflammatory condition caused by an overactive immune system — as well as a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and mortality.

“Cytokine storm can severely damage lungs and lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome and death in patients,” Daneshkhah said. “This is what seems to kill a majority of COVID-19 patients, not the destruction of the lungs by the virus itself. It is the complications from the misdirected fire from the immune system.”

This is exactly where Backman believes vitamin D plays a major role. Not only does vitamin D enhance our innate immune systems, it also prevents our immune systems from becoming dangerously overactive. This means that having healthy levels of vitamin D could protect patients against severe complications, including death, from COVID-19.

Backman is the Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering. Ali Daneshkhah, a postdoctoral research associate in Backman’s laboratory, is the paper’s first author.

The research is available on medRxiv, a preprint server for health sciences.

Nitin Kumar

I am done diploma in filmmaking after completing a diploma, I plunged into the film as an assistant producer/ director Mishra & Vikram Bhatt after congregating cognizance from the ace persons I started my own production house & produced few short films & web series under my banner. I'm obsessed about web series, movies and I have a vast knowledge of OTT platforms and love of filmmaking compels me to penetrate & write about it.

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